Articles Posted in Tax Planning

I want to discuss the difference between a CPA and an EA. Most people refer to any accountant, tax preparer, bookkeeper, etc as a CPA. However there are differences between a CPA, an EA and a tax attorney. All 3 are regulated by the IRS’ circular 230.

The distinction between the two designations is very important, since my specialty is federal taxation and tax accounting. I have chosen to earn the Enrolled Agent license from the US Department of the Treasury because it does not limit the geographic area in which I may practice. In other words, I can work with clients in any of the 50 United States (or its territories), unlike a CPA (certified public accountant), or a tax attorney, who has a license that is state specific.

Get professional tax help today, call us at 1-877-78-TAXES [1-877-788-2937].

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In March 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the “Affordable Care Act”) into law. While some provisions of the ACA have already gone into effect, a number of new provisions are scheduled to take effect January 1, 2014.

Although we do not intend this newsletter to be the answer-all to the ACA, we thought this would be a good time to look at some of the provisions that might affect you.

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Tax Return Preparation
For your tax returns, you want a professional tax firm EA or CPA firm you know you can rely on their tax expertise. Our tax professionals will make sure your federal and state income tax returns, business tax returns and trust and estate tax returns are prepared right from the get go. Our specialized boutique tax firm is trusted by dentists, doctors, lawyers, investors, executives and other professionals and high net-worth individuals. Individuals and businesses from all walks of life have been relying on our firm for quality tax preparation, representation and planning for many years.

Serving Long Beach, Lakewood, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, California
We are A+ accredited member of the Better Business Bureau, we are also an endorsed local provider ELP by Dave Ramsey.

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Mike Habib, EA tax firm provides a wide range of tax preparation, tax planning, tax representation and consulting services. We professionally prepare individual and business tax returns including Federal, State and e-filing. Clients come to us for expert assistance with any tax notice or IRS problem. We serve Pico Rivera, El Monte, CA and other surrounding cities.

Please call us at 562-204-6700 or email us to schedule an appointment.

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If you work in the entertainment industry you know that it has its share of advantages, but it can get tricky at tax time. Depending upon your role – whether you are an entertainer or involved in one of the many other aspects of the industry – you know how busy your schedule gets and how complex your income and expense records can be. The IRS still requires you to file your income tax returns on time, and accurately.

In all probability your return isn’t quite as straightforward as someone who works at a corporation, goes to the same job every day, and gets a weekly or monthly check with all of the taxes taken and accounted for. That’s why it’s even more important to get the right kind of help during tax season; for some entertainers, it may also be advisable to get guidance throughout the year due to the complexity of transactions for income, expenses, and investments particular to this industry.

Don’t compromise on your tax representation!

A tax professional with experience in the entertainment industry can provide you with the best advice.

Our tax firm led by Mike Habib, EA, handles various tax aspects for clients in the Entertainment Industry, for a free confidential consultation, call us today at 1-877-78-TAXES [1-877-788-2937].

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Our firm prides itself for providing various tax services to many Union members. Services such as:

Tax preparation service: we will professionally prepare your federal and state tax returns,
Tax planning: we will work with you to legally strategize and minimize your tax liability,
Tax problems: we will represent you and resolve any unpaid tax debt, or release tax levies such as wage garnishments, bank levies, unfiled back taxes, offer in compromise, and or affordable payment plans,
IRS audit representation: do not face the IRS on your own, we can represent you without you appearing,
Estate & Fiduciary tax: we can prepare and plan your estate and fiduciary tax matter.

For Nationwide Union member call 1-877-78-TAXES [1-877-788-2937]. Free tax consultation.

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What is an Enrolled Agent?
An Enrolled Agent (EA) is a Federally Authorized Tax Practitioner who has technical expertise in the field of taxation and who is empowered by the United States Department of the Treasury to represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the Internal Revenue Service for audits, collections, and appeals.

Our tax firm is led by Mike Habib, EA, the firm’s main office is in Whittier California, we provide professional tax services help for clients throughout Southern California including Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs, Downey, Pico Rivera, Montebello, Hacienda Heights, La Habra Heights, West Covina, La Habra, Brea, Fullerton, Yorba Linda, Cerritos, La Mirada, Lakewood, Anaheim, Santa Ana, Long Beach, Compton, Torrance, Los Angeles, Pasadena, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica and throughout Los Angeles County, Orange County, Corona, San Bernardino County, Riverside County, the Inland Empire, the San Fernando Valley and the San Gabriel Valley.

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2011 year-end tax planning strategies for individual and business taxpayers.

Mike Habib, EA Introduces Tax Planning & Tax Coaching Service

Whittier, CA, November 04, 2011 –(PR.com)– Mike Habib, EA is pleased to announce he has added tax planning and tax coaching to his firm’s services. The new service gives individual and business taxpayers a plain-English plan for beating the IRS – legally by taking advantage to every tax break they deserve.

“Other traditional tax planning firms’ crunches numbers to illustrate ‘what-if’ scenarios based on future assumptions,” said Mr. Habib. It gives clients dry numbers, in more detail than they need or want. But clients don’t want numbers. Clients want savings.

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The following is a summary of the most important tax developments that have occurred in the past three months that may affect you, your family, your investments, and your livelihood. Please contact us for more information about any of these developments and what steps you should implement to take advantage of favorable developments and to minimize the impact of those that are unfavorable.

IRS has issued detailed guidance on the 2010 Tax Relief Act’s 100% bonus depreciation rules for qualifying new property generally acquired and placed in service after Sept. 8, 2010 and before Jan. 1, 2012. Overall, the rules are quite generous. For example, they permit 100% bonus depreciation for components where work on a larger self-constructed property began before Sept. 9, 2010, allow a taxpayer to elect to “step down” from 100% to 50% bonus depreciation for property placed in service in a tax year that includes Sept. 9, 2010, permit 100% bonus depreciation for qualified restaurant property or qualified retail improvement property that also meets the definition of qualified leasehold improvement property, and provide an escape hatch for some business car owners who would otherwise be subject to a draconian depreciation result.

Under the 2010 Tax Relief Act, a taxpayer that buys and places in service a new heavy SUV after Sept. 8, 2010 and before Jan. 1, 2012, and uses it 100% for business, may write off its entire cost in the placed-in-service year. A heavy SUV is one with a GVW rating of more than 6,000 pounds.

The new health reform legislation generally requires employers to report the cost of health insurance they provide to employees on their W-2 forms. Last fall, the IRS made this new reporting requirement optional for all employers for the 2011 Forms W-2. More recently, the IRS announced that the reporting requirement will continue to be voluntary for small employers at least through 2012.

The IRS has announced a second voluntary disclosure initiative designed to bring offshore money back into the U.S. tax system and help people with undisclosed income from hidden offshore accounts get current with their taxes. It will be available through Aug. 31, 2011. The IRS released details of the new voluntary offer, called the 2011 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Initiative (OVDI), in the form of 53 frequently asked questions (FAQs). As with the first offer, participants have to pay back taxes and penalties but will avoid criminal prosecution. The offshore penalty is different under the new offer. The general rule is that the penalty is 25% based on amounts in foreign bank accounts, but can be as low as 12.5% or 5% for some taxpayers.

The IRS has announced new policies and programs to help taxpayers pay back taxes and avoid tax liens. Its goal is to help individuals and small businesses meet their tax obligations, without adding an unnecessary burden to taxpayers.

Specifically, the IRS is:
• Significantly increasing the dollar threshold when liens are generally issued, resulting in fewer tax liens.
• Making it easier for taxpayers to obtain lien withdrawals after paying a tax bill.
• Withdrawing liens in most cases where a taxpayer enters into a Direct Debit Installment Agreement.
• Creating easier access to Installment Agreements for more struggling small businesses; and
• Expanding a streamlined Offer in Compromise program to cover more taxpayers.

Reversing its prior position, the IRS has announced that expenses paid for breast pumps and supplies that assist lactation qualify as deductible medical expenses.
Amounts reimbursed for these expenses under FSAs (flexible spending accounts), Archer MSAs (medical savings accounts), HRAs (health reimbursement arrangements), or HSAs (health savings accounts) are accordingly not income to the taxpayer.

The IRS has explained the income tax and information return consequences of payments made to or on behalf of homeowners under various government programs designed to prevent avoidable foreclosures of homeowners’ homes and stabilize housing markets. In general, homeowners may exclude the payments from income, and may deduct all payments they actually make during 2010-2012 to the mortgage servicer, HUD (the Department of Housing and Urban Development), or the State HFA (housing finance agency) on the home mortgage. The aid payments aren’t subject to information reporting, and there are transition rules for payments that are incorrectly reported.

Late last year, the IRS issued final regulations under which an understated amount of gross income reported on a return resulting from an overstatement of unrecovered cost or other basis is an omission of gross income for purposes of the 6-year period for assessing tax and the minimum period for assessment of tax attributable to partnership items. The 6-year limitations period applies when a taxpayer omits from gross income an amount that’s greater than 25% of the amount of gross income stated in the return. Several courts had held that a basis overstatement is not an omission of gross income for this purpose. In response to these decisions, the IRS issued the new regulations to clarify that an omission can arise in that fashion. Now, some Courts have addressed the regulations. The Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and the Tax Court have rejected the regulations. On the other hand, the Federal Circuit has upheld them and the Seventh Circuit has viewed them favorably. As a result, it looks like the Supreme Court will ultimately have to resolve the issue.

Estates of decedents dying in 2010 can choose zero estate tax, but at the price of beneficiaries being limited to the decedents’ basis plus certain increases. The IRS has announced that Form 8939, Allocation of Increase in Basis for Property Acquired From a Decedent, is not due Apr. 18, 2011 and should not be filed with the final Form 1040 of persons who died in 2010. The IRS says the due date will be set in forthcoming guidance but does not indicate when that guidance may be issued. The forthcoming guidance will also explain the manner in which an executor of an estate may elect to have the estate tax not apply for a decedent dying in 2010.

Married joint return filers are jointly and severally liable for the tax arising from their returns. Innocent spouses may request relief from this liability in certain circumstances. An IRS regulation states that a request for equitable innocent spouse relief must be no later than two years from the first collection activity against the spouse. The Tax Court had found this regulation invalidly imposed a time limit. However, the Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has reversed the Tax Court and upheld the regulation (so has the Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit).

Gambling losses may be deducted only to the extent of gambling winnings, even in the case of an individual engaged in the trade or business of gambling. Previously, the Tax Court had held that losses for purposes of the limitation included both the cost of wagers and business expenses. Earlier this year, the Court overruled its prior position and now says that a professional gambler’s business expenses are not subject to the loss limitation.

In general, a taxpayer must file a claim for credit or refund of tax within three years after filing the return or two years after paying the tax, whichever period expires later. (Code Sec. 6511(a)) However, the statute of limitations is suspended for certain taxpayers who are unable to manage their financial affairs because of a medically determinable mental or physical impairment. A physician’s statement must be submitted to claim this relief, but a Court has made clear that the statement alone doesn’t establish that the taxpayer was financially disabled. Thus, it allowed the IRS to seek additional proof of the taxpayer’s condition.

Call us for tax relief and tax resolution services to resolve any tax problem and get back taxes help by calling 1-877-78-TAXES [1-877-788-2937].

Tax services offered in areas such as: Los Angeles, Whittier, Pasadena, Glendale, Burbank, Orange County, Riverside, Palm Springs, San Bernardino, Palmdale, Bakersfield, New York, New Jersey, Chicago, Houston, Phoenix, Philadelphia, San Antonio, San Diego, Dallas, San Jose, Detroit, Jacksonville, Indianapolis, San Francisco, Columbus, Austin, Memphis, Fort Worth, Baltimore, Charlotte, El Paso, Boston, Seattle, Washington DC, Milwaukee, Denver, Louisville, Jefferson, Las Vegas, Reno, Hempstead, Tucson, Nashville, Davidson, Portland, Tucson, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Anchorage, Atlanta, Long Beach, Fresno, Sacramento, Mesa, Kansas City, Cleveland, Virginia Beach, Omaha, Miami, Oakland, Tulsa, Honolulu, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, Colorado Springs, Arlington, Wichita, Birmingham, Montgomery, Tampa, Orlando

Do you owe unpaid back taxes? There are tax relief solutions to your IRS tax problems.

The IRS could file a federal tax lien to protect the US government from the back taxes owed by the taxpayer. Although the federal IRS tax lien attaches to all the taxpayer’s property, some property is exempt from the IRS levy. The following items could be exempt from levy to some extent:

(1) wearing apparel and school books,
(2) fuel, provisions, furniture, and personal effects: up to $8,250 for 2010 ($8,370 for 2011),
(3) unemployment benefits,
(4) books and tools of a trade, business, or profession: up to $4,120 for 2010 ($4,180 for 2011),
(5) undelivered mail,
(6) certain annuity and pension payments,
(7) workers’ compensation,
(8) judgments for support of minor children,
(9) certain AFDC, social security, state and local welfare payments and Job Training Partnership Act payments,
(10) certain amounts of wages, salary, and other income, and
(11) certain service-connected disability payments ( Code Sec. 6334(a)).

If you owe back taxes, you should note that certain specified payments are not exempt from levy, wage garnishment and bank levy, if the Secretary of the Treasury approves the levy. Among the items so covered are certain wage replacement payments as specified at Code Sec. 6334(f).

If you’re seeking back taxes help, the IRS may not seize any real property used as a residence by the taxpayer or any real property of the taxpayer (other than rental property) that is used as a residence by another person in order to satisfy a liability of $5,000 or less (including tax, penalties and interest). In the case of the taxpayer’s principal residence, the IRS may not seize the residence without written approval of a federal district court judge or magistrate ( Code Sec. 6334(a)(13) and (e)). Unless the collection of the back tax is in jeopardy, tangible personal property or real property (other than rented real property) used in the taxpayer’s trade or business may not be seized without written approval of an IRS district or assistant director. Such approval may not be given unless it is determined that the taxpayer’s other assets subject to IRS collection are not sufficient to pay the amount due and the expenses of the proceedings. Where a levy is made on tangible personal property essential to the taxpayer’s trade or business, the IRS must provide an accelerated appeals process to determine whether the property should be released from levy ( Code Sec. 6343(a)(2)).

Also, if you owe back taxes, tax levies are prohibited if the estimated expenses of the levy and sale exceed the fair market value of the property ( Code Sec. 6331(f)). Also, unless the collection of the back tax is in jeopardy, a levy cannot be made on any day on which the taxpayer is required to respond to an IRS summons ( Code Sec. 6331(g)). Financial institutions, such as banks and brokerage firms, are required to hold amounts levied or garnished by the IRS for 21 days after receiving notice of the levy to provide the taxpayer time to notify the IRS of any errors or possible resolve their back tax matters ( Code Sec. 6332(c)).

Keywords: back taxes, back taxes help, stop IRS tax levy, stop wage garnishment, stop bank levy, payroll tax problems, IRS tax lien release withdrawal, tax relief, tax resolution services, IRS tax problem

We provide back taxes help in all 50 states including Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming.